Monday, May 16, 2016

Leonardo da Vinci and Jeff Koons

Selling off some of my goodies turned out to be (a) successful beyond my wildest hopes, and (b) time-consuming! But that of course doesn't meant that I wasn't thinking of you all...

Sundays, when we are in town, we have breakfast at Le Pain Quotidien, and then visit the Art Institute of Chicago for an hour or so. Today, for the first time, I saw this piece, by Jeff Koons. It's quite large - maybe 5 feet tall - and really pretty, in an abstract and rather baroque way.


Christ and the Lamb by Jeff Koons


Oh, that's pretty, I thought, but didn't really "get" it....

THEN, one of the guards stopped me. "Do you have a cell phone?" she asked. Actually, I very rarely take my phone with me on Sundays, but I had it with me because I wanted to get some notes about work to use here on The Vivienne Files, or in my book.

"Google The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne, by Da Vinci" she told me...


The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne by Leonard da Vinci


Look at the two works of art together.... 

I didn't get it... 

detail from The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne by Leonard da Vinci; Christ and the Lamb by Jeff Koons

She she started pointing out the parallels to me. And suddenly, it was all SO CLEAR...
 
detail from The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne by Leonard da Vinci; Christ and the Lamb by Jeff Koons

If you still struggle to see it, stand back a little bit, or make the images smaller.

I was gobsmacked, and HAD to share it with you. What WILL artists think of next?

love,
Janice

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23 comments:

  1. What an excellent museum guard! It's often so worth it to do a guided tour or to get the headphones so you don't miss these details that aren't so obvious. I don't approve of the folks who wear the headphones and who ignore everything in a room but the thing they're pointed to. The headphones have a pause button! Museums aren't for speeding through, unless you have a membership and plan to come back many times. (I used to go to the Met in NY for just an hour, and just look at one corner of it, like Grecian urns, and not try to do too much).
    Thanks for pointing out this beauty.

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  2. So cool! Thank you for sharing it! Judy

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  3. Janice,
    Art is truly in the eye of the beholder !

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  4. I love this piece! Is it new at the museum? I've never seen it there - but I haven't been to the Art Institute in quite a while.

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  5. Super cool and what a great guide!

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  6. Oh, wow! I can see it -- the features on his little upturned face, Mary's hand around his waist. That's amazing.

    Is it a mirror?

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  7. Here is a quote from the artist:
    "Anything that reflects has a kind of spiritual transcendence because it involves the viewer. It acknowledges your presence. Every time you move, the reflection changes; it always acknowledges you."

    -Jeff Koons--

    xoxoKaren

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    1. Very cool. Thanks for sharing, Karen!

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  8. Oh, wow - that is so cool! Thanks for this.

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  9. I will continue to appreciate the original.
    Deb from Vancouver

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    1. As is your right - don't ever let anybody tell you what you should admire or love!
      hugs,
      Janice

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  10. Wow! I looked at the first picture trying to see how the title worked in it. So cool the guard shared with you and then you shared with us! I can totally see it now. Thank you to both!

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  11. Very interesting! Thanks for sharing!

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  12. Wow! Not only did he re-interpret the form of the painting, he did the same for the framing. Super interesting. Thanks! (And pass on our thanks to that guard, if you get a chance.)

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  13. I am so glad you shared this Janice! I love learning things like this! How very cool! Glad you had your phone with you...

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  14. That's astounding! Thank you!

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  15. Next? Probably having a crew make his art, while he signs the piece, makes millions and they work anonymously and are paid by the job, not on the sale. Oh wait, he already did.

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    1. Yes. And for some strange reason I really don't like his "work". It looks like like a hot mess. As Madonna would say, it is reductive, and I'd much rather see Leonardo's master piece.

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