Wednesday, June 05, 2013

Thinking about grey and black; color, and your immediate environment

from Windy City Art
The comments about my recent Project 333 post were an interesting conversation about colors, and who's comfortable wearing what colors in what environments.

I'm looking out my window right now, which faces south and west, looking out onto downtown Chicago.  The only colors I can see are shades of grey and beige - even the sky is grey right now.  If you love cities (and I DO love cities), it's a beautiful view.  But if you're looking for color, this is not where you'll find it.

I take all of your comments very seriously.  I read every one of them, and think about what you've taken the time to say.  I gave a great deal of thought to comments which thought that my current wardrobe is dark, depressed, or reflective of some inner mental struggle.  Really, I considered the possibility!

But I have to reject the idea of depression.  I've got some exciting things underway (stay tuned, big changes are in the very near future!), and I'm arguably the happiest person I meet, day in and day out.

I live surrounded by subtle monotones.  It's the way we live in the city. And I dress accordingly.  I know people in this neighborhood who routinely wear brightly colored garments, and... well... it isn't a look I want for myself.  I'm fascinated by the idea of a wardrobe of brightly-colored clothing, worn in a more nature-filled setting, with a different light, and a very different prevailing aesthetic.  I can see how that wardrobe would be perfect for that environment, and how it could be very appropriate, very beautiful, and very practical.

But that's not my current reality.

Thanks again for your comments - they are indeed what keeps me going every day on this blog!

57 comments:

  1. Hi Janice. I have been reading your blog for quite a while now and read others comments with great interest. I would NEVER class you as depressed. You are simply a lady who knows she looks great in black! white and grey. Never let anyone else's comments sway you from the truth you know about yourself.

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  2. I agree with Allthatglitters. I too read your blog religiously. I bookmark all of your best blogs for future reference and reminders. Thank you for that, by the way.

    Sometimes a monochromatic color scheme works best. I have a hard time wearing black on black, but my entire wardrobe revolves around colors similar to the ones you selected this go around. I applaud your selections and look forward to seeing what you will do with them.

    I am especially interested in your thought process and how you use it to evolve your style. Thank you for sharing.

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  3. Janice, your blog is constantly interesting and inspiring. Recently, I had a similar comment blurted out to me about wearing black. Consider that I'm not in the blogosphere like you, where comments must be expected. So this comment made out of the blue was a little insulting. Black and grey are the core of my wardrobe, but I do wear color - in accessories. I have white hair..it's what works best. I came across this quote from designer Yohji Yamamoto. It's not my reason for wearing black, but I liked it nonetheless:
    "Black is modest and arrogant at the same time. Black is lazy and easy - but mysterious. But above all, black says this: "I don't bother you - don't bother me."
    Once a person finds a core color that always looks best on them and that makes them feel confident and "dressed", why on earth should anyone feel they know better?
    Keep up the good work and inspiration!
    L. in Canada

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    1. With white hair, black and white can be quite sophisticated!

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  4. Depressed, dreary? No way. I think sleek and sophisticated! I take every one of your entries very seriously. I look at the underlying thought process and even if the featured combo is not up my alley, I'm thinking of a friend that it would suit perfectly. Once again, your bog is my first event of the day, with a cup of coffee and my two terriers snuggled in bed! Susan in SLC

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    1. What she said....minus the terriers.

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    2. What she said, but with a cat. ;-)

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  5. I was born and raised in Germany, where we, as you well know, dress as does most of northern Europe, mostly in neutrals. When I first moved to the US, I was aghast at all that color (not to mention the size of the accessories). My neutrals are mostly in the beige/brown/khaki shades and though I deviated a bit here and there by adding some color, I stuck pretty much to my neutral core. To my mind, I can get a whole lot more wear from a costly pair of slacks in a neutral basic than a bright red. Also, I do not like to draw attention to myself, and that's hard to do when mixing patterns or wear bright florals. ;)

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    1. I'm coming from the opposite direction: from the Caribbean to Germany. And I'm just now figuring out how to balance the use of colour with some neutral baiscs so that my closet doesn't explode! :-)

      So thanks a lot Janice. Glad you're not letting them phase you. It is after all only someone's opinion.

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  6. BTW- I'll vouch that most of Florida doesn't care about black or grey during the summer. I live in Tallahassee year round, grew up in central Florida and travel throughout the state professionally. The colors and patterns do get more vibrant the closer to the ocean you go. A majority of people still love their neutrals, even in Miami. The only places that really seem to get crazy colorful is in beach towns. I've noticed the same thing with Georgia when I traveled in Georgia frequently, too.
    I used to maintain a black, white and denim wardrobe because it was inexpensive and everything matched. The only comment I've ever gotten about wearing black was a comment from a neighbor that children under 10 should never wear black dresses when I was a child. Honestly I get more comments on my personal insistence that flipflops are not shoes, and my dislike of short sleeves due to scarring on my arms.
    Even now that I've softened my personal palette to dove grey, navy, ivory, rose beige and teal my wardrobe is 90% neutral.

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  7. Janice, I'm back, so to speak. This environment/color question is fascinating. I live in a very small rural village in New England. I feel much more comfortable in neutrals that sort of blend in with the surrounding hills, farms, and the Common (town green). That means that black, especially in summer, seems too stark, unless it's a sleeveless or at night. That's fine with me, since I've been retiring the remainders of my work wardrobe since retiring here. I prefer to wear softer neutrals as my core pieces, with colors as accents.. That said, I do live in preppy NE! So lots of people are decked out in bright pink and lime green. FIne with me. I do love your comparison to your own environment in Chicago. And when I travel to sophisticated cities, I wear...black! Or grey or navy or beige in summer.

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  8. Janice --It is painful to think that some of the commentary as projected such difficult things on to you. What strikes me about that lovely photo of Chicago and your wardrobe choices are the subtle and rich textures of the colors. Your thoughts about how they fit into that lovely urban landscape are awfully insightful, too. I don't always read all of the comments. But, it is painful to thinks that people would say such things! Dressing is such an individual thing! And, so is color choice. One of the things I appreciate so much about your talent set with this blog is your ability to help those of us who don't wear the same core colors understand how to coordinate, mix and match, and pair down in a way that makes sense for our life styles and wardrobes. Love your blog! Susan in Minneapolis.

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  9. I agree that it's not a depressing palette; however, I do think it is more of a big city/Northern palette. As I commented previously, I do love the outfits but would have a hard time wearing them here in the summer. Even replacing most of the black with white would lighten it up enough for the South while still keeping it simple and monochromatic.

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  10. I'm a reader from the south who said she could not wear black and gray exclusively in the summer in Dallas. That does not mean that I don't understand why Janice wears them in HER environment. Today, I am wearing a black and cream sleeveless dress, wearing black flats, and carrying a black straw bag. Last night, I wore a solid black dress out to dinner with black heels. I totally love wearing black and neutrals, but have to have some color in the summer. But, more than that, we just can't wear long sleeves in the summer (even cardigans) on a day in day out basis. I do think there are regional differences (even in big cities), but I would never say that someone who wore neutrals year round is depressed. I think it has to do with environment and also working in an office environments. I'm sure the neutral palette is perfectly appropriate for that.

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  11. And I should have said appropriate for Chicago (and many other cities) in general. Today, when I meet a friend at a popular new restaurant close to downtown Dallas, I'll take note of what women are wearing. It will be a mixture of career professionals as well as ladies who lunch. I'm the latter, but will be in the black and cream.

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  12. It's interesting that grey and black seem depressing to people. To me they are my happy colors. I only have two items in my wardrobe that are not grey, black, camel, and navy. I am addicted to grey, wool dresses. Color and pattern seem overly busy to me and they are just too loud. I enjoy color on others, just not me. I don't know how much environment plays a role. I grew up in a beach town in a house that only had sand between it and the Pacific. I only live a few miles from Malibu now. I am still drawn only to dark neutrals. I think neutrals have a calm feeling about them - control and confidence. Color seems to be about exuberance and excitement. I have enough of that with 180 8th graders to deal with :).

    Leah

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    1. "Color and pattern seem overly busy to me."

      I can deal with color (or at least some colors), but I so agree about pattern. The other day a congresswoman that I admire was on TV. I wanted to listen to what she was saying, but her dress was a very bold, large-scale black-and-white abstract print. The print was so distracting that, try as I might, I just couldn't focus on her words.

      kris

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  13. Love the idea of color choices reflecting our environment! Certainly Janice's wardrobe reflects her city environment beautifully. My house is on the edge of a wetlands preserve, and I love flowers, so my home environment is filled with warm neutrals and beautiful colors. My job, however, is in high tech so I work in a sterile cubicle farm managing technical data all day long. Perhaps my need for color in my wardrobe is reflective of my desire to carry the natural environment of my home into my work place; an attempt to naturalize the technical. ... Perhaps that's too philosophical. Color simply makes me happy.

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    1. I don't think it's too philosophical; to me, it's brilliantly insightful into the varying environments in your life and the way in which you've integrated them. Sounds like wisdom to me...

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  14. From what I've seen and experienced myself, I find your wardrobe choices very appropriate for life in the big city. When I look at the above picture I see subtle color. The dark burgandy of the bridge the deep blue green of the water as well as the shades of grey and beige. IMHO, an interestig color palette.

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    1. I think it's in the eye of the beholder - perhaps i've spent the last few days reading all the posts. I saw deep brown, beige, white/ivory, linen, peach, and jaded grey...

      Janice, I don't think your black and grey is depressing. Even though I try to steer clear of it (hard for a Deep Winter), but I'm learning.

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  15. I think you're doing a fantastic job figuring out your wardrobe and what works best for you. Having a good core of neutrals makes it easy for you. Black doesn't suit me (one of my students told me it makes my eyes look "sunken in" and she was right!), but navy works well as a dark neutral for me. I go towards the warm beige/camel/khaki in the summer. What I enjoy seeing in your blog are the different types of pieces you have in your neutrals (pant and skirt styles) that you are able to combine to make many different looks. And then you are so clever with your accessories--I have bought two new scarves because of your influence and have found many uses for them. Please continue to blog and share with us your thoughts!

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  16. When I lived in London, I wore black and grey ALL the time. I also wore a lot of black in Paris. But now I live in a midwestern college town and the black just looks wrong with the sky, the buildings, the grass, and everything else. I agree. It's all abour context.

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  17. I moved to the Central Valley in California from a big city. I love neutrals and black has always been one of my favorites. I continue to wear deep colors in the winter, but in the summer we get many days over 100 degrees. I did not stop wearing black, but wore it sparingly, and in summer appropriate pieces like sleeveless tops and materials like silk and linen. The other big change I made was to wear a lot of white, cream and khaki in the summer. So I've kept my neutral palette but switch from darker to lighter with the seasons. And sometimes I'll wear a red piece--my favorite bright color.

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  18. Until about a month ago I wore black almost exclusively and now find myself actively resisting it as I get ready to transition from work to being a SAHM. Context is everything.

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  19. Such an interesting and insightful post. I am in my 60s now and have almost eliminated black from my wardrobe: not because I find it depressing but because it is too harsh for my mature skin. When I lived and worked in London I had a fair bit of black, navy and other neutrals in my wardrobe. Now I live in Spain, my wardrobe is a lot more colourful, though not too bright as that would also look harsh on me. So, is it my environment I wonder or the fact that I am getting older?!!

    I should add that, although your core colours are different to mine, I still find your blog inspiring. Also, your clever use of accessories means that your choices are never dull or depressing!

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    1. I have also eliminated black for the same reason. Charcoal works much better now that I'm 60+. I also switched from white to ivory, which is more flattering to a mature face.

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  20. I do believe enviornment is key - both urban vs. country vs. beach and also the quality of light. I am a huge fan of tailored suits, so I tend to follow some menswear blogs as well. There is a concept of "city suits" and "country suits", with the color pallates being very different - charcoal, navy, pinstripes for the city, browns, olive greens, tweeds for the country. Not many people of either gender formally keep those distinctions today, but it does help explain why color palattes that work for northern cities don't work as well for southern resorts.

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  21. I commented yesterday on seeing myself in a pink printed top that was truly not my style and looked frumpy. That was not to say that pink or prints are intrinsically frumpy. But on me it looked like cruise-wear and made me feel out of my element. If you are a style conscious person, you will know that something is not quite right. It could be that the item feels wrong for the environment or perhaps, as my pink printed tee, just wrong for you. I changed later that day to white jeans and a navy and white striped mariniere tee and felt great. Environment plays a part, locality plays a part and personal taste all combine to create one's "look."

    When I went to Ireland, I loved the style I saw and would definitely adopt it if I emigrated. I probably was easy to spot as an American with my yellow raincoat, but that was just fine because I loved how I looked. To each his own

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  22. It's good to know that I'm not the only one who wears colours based on the surroundings. I live in a city by the lake. So I wear a lot of blacks, blues, greys, greens and browns. I love and enjoy wearing those colours. Thank you for sharing this post. It's no wonder why your previous post seem odd. Don't let the negative comments get to you. They shouldn't judge you without knowing who you really are. They could've asked why those colours. Keep up the good work on your blog!

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  23. I agree and think you're quite right about environment.
    In our Swiss cities, with a strong influence from Italy, too, there is a plethora of black, grey and neutrals. Funnily enough (and as a British author here noted!), middle-aged women often wear red or burgundy shoes!! Younger girls often wear red Converse... (I spent the last two days in Lucerne and Zurich and noticed many!! Also red glasses for older ladies?!)
    I myself have always loved colour and enjoy using it in my wardrobe - although I will adapt if I'm going to the city or somewhere with city people and wear a black dress or something because I've learnt that I feel I stand out too much or just feel wrong in my usual standard clothes. Left to my own devices, I use different colours throughout the year, e.g. I wear a lot of burgundy, purple, orange and mustard with a dash of green in the autumn. At home in the summer I am wearing turquoise, pink, white, navy and cream. When I go to our house in coastal Brittany, I will see so many "marine" stripes I won't want to even begin to fit in - there, my style is quite different, more bohemian, and soft raspberry, gentle cornflower, khaki, muted mint, faded navy...

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  24. Sheesh! Each to their own, to begin with ... and then, yes, so much more comes into it, as several folks have mentioned = location, light, culture, office culture, skin tone, hair color, personal preferences, etc.

    I grew up in Miami and have lived in North Carolina, Chicago, San Francisco, Southern California, and now Oregon. I could go on and on about regional differences, but will spare you that. ;) I will say that I no longer wear black or white near my face; now that I'm in my late 50s, it doesn't work for me.

    LOVE YOUR BLOG!!!

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  25. and an additional comment: you might be interested in the sewing blog "fool for fabric" (think it's fool4fabric@blogspot.com). Margy dresses only in black, white, and gray, and her accent color is red. (And she's very exacting about the "right" red.) She looks truly incredible--knows her self and personal style inside and out. And, really, isn't that what it's all about?

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  26. Janice, your combinations are inspiring. You should not let people's comments about darker colors make you feel bad about yourself. My "over 45" wardrobe has many dark basics. They just look better on me. If I want a pop of color, I add one of my hermes scarves to brighten things up! Keep doing what feels right for YOU!!!

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  27. LOVE this blog. Recently let my hair go to its natural gray, which turned out white! Had to revamp my wardrobe from tan neutrals ( my hair was dyed a dark, golden blonde as it was naturally in my younger years) to black, charcoal, and blues. Even white seems too stark with my fair skin! Janice has been a Godsend! I might mention I also don't wear anything but solids and my outfits are usually monochromatic! This just fits my genuine, sensible personality!

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  28. Ahem, no one is JUDGING Janice. I don't know why people think that or say that. What we are saying is that the black/gray color palette doesn't always seem right for different locales. It's a subtle thing, but noticeable for those of us who live in different places.

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    1. This was why I decided to follow up on the earlier post - I didn't really feel judged, but I wanted to make sure that people understood the perspective of wishing to dress to blend into this particular environment. I think it's a fascinating topic, and I'm really enjoying the comments from everyone with very different experiences than my own.

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    2. I find it a fascinating topic also--and totally understand your choices. I haven't seen any negative comments here---so I am puzzled why some posters keep alluding to them.

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    3. It totally is about environment, context, and a person's 'place in their life' so to speak. (I just came here via Over50feeling40, BTW) and I have found this very thing to be true over the past 7-8 or so years.

      I moved from the Chicago suburbs- corporate job- to Phoenix, and now have a job in a much more casual setting. Over the first couple years I lived here, I felt like my wardrobe was just 'wrong.' It took me a while to figure it out, but between my work setting and the brightness of the sun and desert setting, the rich jewel tones (burgundy, dark green, dark blues) I used to favor back in Illinois just didn't 'fit' out here. Now that I've gotten integrated into the desert landscape and more used to the brightness and different quality of light, I gravitate more towards brighter and lighter colors such as coral, light blues, peach, and white / ecru. Not to mention that I'm in my mid-40s now, and (hopefully) getting more confident about my own personality.

      I say, wear what you like, what makes you feel good, and what fits in with your setting and time in life. And I look forward to reading more of your blog!

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  29. I currently work in a colour standards laboratory. We produce tiles to be used in instruments to calibrate the colour of pretty much everything, all over the world, and we test items to provide colour definitions.
    The appeal, attractiveness, and appropriateness of colours is very much dependant on their surrounding environment and the quality of the light. For example the tile we produce for a burger chain to use in their manufacturing bakery to 'set' the colour their buns will be baked to - is selected and calibrated against the colour of the interior of their store and the lighting they use. The burger buns look appetising (well, sort of) in store, but the colour of the calibration tile in our lab, surrounded by drab victorian industrial buildings and lit by a perpetually grey sky is absolutely hideous. Honestly, it's the most disgusting colour I have ever seen.

    Personally, I have moved the UK from Australia and find that colours which once looked appropriate (maybe even subtle!) now look garish and awkward the moment I step outside. I don't wear black, and it has been really difficult for me to adjust the colour I wear so that I feel I look right in my surroundings here. But, your blog has helped a lot so thank you!

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  30. Janice - First let me say that I can't believe people spend time writing negative comments after all the time you spend putting together and sharing these great outfits. Second, on the subject of black and monochromatic dressing, all I have to say is...Audrey and Katherine Hepburn. Enough said!

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  31. Janice, I wasn't worried about the monotone nature of your current wardrobe, rather that you're not wearing scarves while sticking to neutrals for 3 of the 7 days last week, but then again, you might have worn them and not shown them, it might have been too hot for so many layers, or any of a number of other reasons. In any event, as long as you are happy in the multiple layers of your life, then the colors you wear aren't really an issue. With Friday's post, I though you are, and with today's post there's no question. Now I'm curious about your anticpated changes.

    Carla.

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  32. Hi, Janice,
    First of all thank you so much for the blog which has been a source of inspiration for me (a 40- something finance professional from New England). I must admit I chuckled a bit at the comments that your selections were too monochromatic. Have they never been to NYC? All Bllllllaaaaccccckkkk. But I can understand because when I travel south, or when a southerner visits our Boston office, it always seems like they are wearing 1. too much makeup, 2. too many garish colors and 3. Something too fussy. I think we dress in response to our surroundings: see your photo of Chicago...after 48 hours in FL in January you can find me settling into to white and fushcia, with shiny pink lip gloss, which would like really odd in Boston then,LOL. So, there is something wrong with lime green n Chicago on a rainy spring day, just like charcoal gray looks odd in Ft. lauderdale on a blinding May afternoon. Please carry on, with annual trip south in winter!

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  33. I moved from an international city to a desert community and almost overnight (well, over about six months), my wardrobe went from about 28 black sweaters, 30 blazers with some combination of black (herringbone, tweed, plaid), 52 black slacks, a kazillion black pumps and boots, and 20 black suits--with accents of brown and grey...to fuscia, lime green, tangerine, watermelon, flower patterns. It just feels cooler and happier. And the colors match the frequency of the bright blue sky.

    Now it is quite an adjustment when I go back home to try to embody the air of monochrome cool stylishness again. Like fashion jet lag. But I do it!

    Surroundings count. A LOT.

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  34. Depressing? Really? Hmmmm...........can't please everyone I guess. Your wardrobe neutrals are very common in the workplace. I would say environment is a major factor in wardrobe color. After all, black suits would look strange in the Caribbean and likewise,tropical prints in the boardroom. I wear a lot of black too, yes, even in the summer!! :)

    I appreciate your blog so much! It has changed the way I pack and think about my future wardrobe additions! Thanks for the inspiration!

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  35. My base is black, grey and white/cream. I have a million scarves with lots of color. I think of the base color as the background on a photo - it makes the color in my scarves and jewelry pop. Dreary? Never!

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  36. About the scarf comment above--I wanted to say a huge thank you for the blog post a while ago where you said something like, 'Or no scarves! You don't have to wear scarves!' I have been trying to do the scarf thing ever since subscribing to your blog so long ago. Although I covet Hermes scarves now thanks to seeing them so beautifully set in ensembles on your blog, I don't wear them well. After that comment, I happily substitute my statement necklaces, pearls, brooches, and interesting necklines for the scarves and don't kick myself for being a fashion dunce. So I really appreciate the outfits that have all kinds of accents. Don't get me wrong--I love the ones with the scarves, too! But usually more like looking at a Monet or a Picasso, giving me inspiration for color combinations. And every once in a while I'll step out of my comfort zone and wear the perfect scarf if I have it, and feel daring, French, and fun.

    Thank you for your blog--it's my inspiration for getting dressed in the morning, AND for packing for dreaded business trips. I'm down to a single carry on, even for a week!

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  37. If I may throw a different variable into the mix.... instead of dressing to fit in with surroundings, what about dressing to reflect our personalities? I look ok in black (I know, we always pick on black) but when I wear it I feel heavy, weighted down, and sluggish. Same thing if I were to wear muted, grayed tones. On the other hand, I have a daughter -epitome of artsy bohemian - who looks wonderful in her low contrast outfits with flowing fabric and subtle patterns. Those clothes fit her gentle nature. Have you ever seen someone wearing structured business suits, all lines and planes, whose long curly hair made you think "something here just doesn't add up"?

    The thread (ha ha...pun intended) running through these comments that I see is that there has to be more than one kind of harmony for an outfit to "sing."

    Color - of skin, hair, fabric
    Contrast - between eyes, hair, fabric, skin, jewelry
    Texture - fabric, skin, hair
    Line - prints, weaves, garment details, curves, angles, points
    Size/scale - garment details, wearer, print
    Propriety - occasion, surroundings, expectations
    Quality - fit, cleanliness, maintenance

    When you think of all the different elements which come into play, it's any wonder we look as good as we do!
    Thanks everyone! Your thoughtful comments are a pleasure to read!

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  38. Colour is so subjective. I fall into the neutral camp with grey being my favorite colour of all. My friend sees this as safe and boring but to my eye it's soft and classic. She dresses in bright primary colours which are 'fun' but to me are child like and clownish. Lucky we all like to be different :)

    Thanks again for your blog Janice.
    Cheers, Fiona

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  39. Colour is so subjective. I fall into the neutral camp with grey being my favorite colour of all. My friend sees this as safe and boring but to my eye it's soft and classic. She dresses in bright primary colours which are 'fun' but to me are child like and clownish. Lucky we all like to be different :)

    Thanks again for your blog Janice.
    Cheers, Fiona

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  40. I've always perceived black and grey as chic and am envious that you can wear those colors. I have spring skin coloring ...fair skin with auburn hair so unfortunately black/grey/white doesn't suit me. I am now quite strict with buying only navy as my base color and add tomato red, tan/warm camel, azure blue, violet and coral depending on the season. I am definitely more influenced by my skin color than my environment when choosing colors for my clothes. Your blog has given me so much inspiration Janice - thank you! I love reading all your comments too - so informative.

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  41. I haven't had a chance to read all of the responses this morning. I am a teacher and the students are pouring in. When I saw the photo, I zoomed right in on the red flag. I could definitely dress in the neutrals suggested and discussed, but I would pair it all with red shoes. I love the surprise of a color with neutrals. You are brilliant!I am so inspired by your wardrobe ideas, and have been for a year or two. I need to start joining into the discussions.

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  42. I knew something was in the works when you starting using your whole name. Is it a book? A column? You are a great writer in addition to having a wonderful aesthetic sense--so many things are possible. Can't wait to hear....

    By the way, I am writing from Paris. Most of the long "pashmina" type scarves have disappeared, replaced by...? I don't know. Also, the color accent I see most as I look over seas of people--orange and coral. These may be tourists.

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  43. As a person with flaming red hair, fair skin, and freckles, I was brought up wearing brown, gold, olive--the fall colors. I always felt overwhelmed. In NYC in the 80s, I discovered black and have never looked back. I live a mile from the Pacific Ocean now, so I added gray, (denim) blue, and white. My hair is still my "accent color" and I feel that now people can see me, no longer hidden in the "foliage".

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  44. I find this post really enlightening! I've moved twice in the last 6 years, (in addition to getting older). And I was confused as to why I felt the need to cull my wardrobe so much after the last move. I started out in the shadow of NYC, and my wardrobe was very black. I moved to North Carolina, and I started wearing lots of bright flowered prints and jewel tones. I felt like my wardrobe had matured. But recently I moved to a semi-metropolitan city in Wisconsin, and my wardrobe no longer fit and I felt the need to redo once again!

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  45. I LOVE living in the city as well, but I think it's more accurate to dress according one's inner landscape instead of letting the outer landscape dictate one's wardrobe palette. Despite living in several "gray" cities, I do feel happier and more alive in the city, thus I dress in brighter colors and patterns.

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  46. I used to work in the building behind the apparel mart and cross over the Kinzie street bridge every day. Dressing for work after a commute that was more like a trek, was a challenge. Now that we are in Phoenix, dressing is more delightful. I enjoy dresses now as never before. I love the wrap dressing ideas. Thanks!

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