Monday, September 17, 2012

A Revolving Door Rant

Even the Ritz in Paris has revolving doors...

Yes, it's a small thing.  But it's an IMPORTANT small thing.  USE THE REVOLVING DOORS, PEOPLE!!!

"How big a difference can using a revolving door make? In 2006, a team of graduate students at MIT conducted an analysis of door use in one building on campus, E25, where they found just 23 percent of visitors used the revolving doors. According to their calculations, the swinging door allowed as much as eight times more air to pass through the building than the revolving door. Applying average Boston weather to their equations, the MIT team found that if everyone used the revolving doors, it would save more than 75,000 kilowatt-hours of energy—about 1.5 percent of the total required to heat and cool the building—and prevent 14.6 tons of carbon dioxide from being emitted. * (By way of comparison, the EPA says an average American vehicle emits about six tons of carbon dioxide over a year.) The gains are also big enough that they could easily cover the energy needed to power an automatic revolving door, which has a 250-watt motor."  Slate - July 29, 2008

Every day, I see dozens of people walk PAST the revolving doors and pull open the swinging doors.  Young, healthy people who claim to be friends of the environment. 

/rant

18 comments:

  1. Very interesting, I had no idea. Perhaps a public awareness campaign is in order?

    I rarely encounter revolving doors here in SoCal. They always give me a slight anxiety that the back of my heel is going to get clipped somehow so I've always been happy there aren't many:)

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  2. They are everywhere here in Chicago, which I'm guessing is the inspiration for this rant. Even putting environmental concerns aside, I find it so inconsiderate when it's freezing out and people use the swinging door instead of the revolving one at a restaurant or store, blasting everyone within fifteen feet of the door with cold air.

    And have you ever noticed people don't just open the swinging door enough to get through? No, they always open it as wide as it can open, letting in as much cold air possible and making sure it takes as long as possible for the door to close again!

    /rant

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  3. Yes, anxiety is a reason for not using them. Maybe the bright folks at MIT should address the question of WHY people don't use them? Then we all win!

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  4. I hate, hate, hate revolving doors! They are impossible for anyone with a baby stroller, a lot of packages, or small children in tow. I'm always afraid someone will get in behind me and shove the door into my back. No thanks! (and I always hold doors open for mothers who are pushing strollers.) Sorry, Janice, I cannot agree with you on this one.

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    1. Oh, this is NOT meant for people with strollers etc. There's a definite need for a door on hinges for a lot of people - please don't think I was making a blanket statement here. I'm ranting at 22 year old boys carrying NOTHING who still can't push the revolving door. Sorry if you misunderstood!

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  5. I'm afraid of them! I use them anyway but I hate that trapped feeling.

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  6. Sadly due to mobility issues I dont like using revolving doors, maybe whoever designed them could have thought about a different type of environmentally friendly door as well.

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  7. Revolving doors - I hate them. I won't use them if I have other options.
    --LindaC

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  8. I admit to not wanting to use revolving doors because they are slow. BUT....as someone who wants to be the best steward of resources, including others' air conditioning, you have convinced me to use the revolving door. Thanks for the stats!

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  9. Here in the Northeastern US almost all doors are what we refer to as airlock doors (I don't know if there is a specific architectural term for them) where you step into an enclosed space and open a second set of doors to enter the building. Is this less common elsewhere? I wonder how those compare to revolving doors. It is certainly nicer to have a place to stop and wipe your shoes and close your umbrella than the insistant push of an unfriendly door shoving you quickly along. But then I've never seen a revolving door anywhere in my state. Probably they get all jammed up with snow and don't work.

    Mel

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  10. Good morning from the southern most part of Australia.
    A total change of subject if you don't mind. I've recently found your blog and have been reading through last year's and this year's posts.
    I went through my wardrobe the other day, and while there are still too many clothes, they are in 5 logical and coordinating colours.
    I had some clothes put away, and one item was a dark oatmeal jumper that belonged to my father. I took it as a keepsake after he died. It has been sitting in the box for 12 years. I chose to wear it this morning and looked at the label to see what it was. Thrilled to find it is cashmere. Thanks Dad.
    I have been reading about your cashmere jumpers and priced some the other day at nearly $600. Way out of my budget. But today I am wearing my very own cashmere jumper.
    Black pants, black patent low heeled lace ups, black blazer, dark oatmeral v neck cashmere jumper, all tied together with a black/brown/cream and exact dark oatmeal animal print scarf.
    I would never have appreciated the jumper if I hadn't read your blog.

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  11. This is one of my pet peeves too. There are so many little things that we can do for the environment that we just don't realize. People use the doors because they think it is faster than the revolving one. Though, I have to say, sometimes at hospitals, I want to laugh that the people in wheelchairs and walkers seem to try the revolving doors more than the healthy people. We are a strange breed.

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  12. Thank you for the PSA.
    I have absolutely no anxiety about using a revolving door nor have I ever equated it with energy conservation. I have learned something new today and will keep the doors in Boston spinning.
    J

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  13. I actually had a very frightening accident in a revolving door when I was a young child. No way I will use them if there is another option. It's not just anxiety stopping me from using them, it's actual experience.

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  14. Fascinating. I'm 55 and well-educated, but had never heard before today that revolving doors saved energy. It makes sense---but I'd never heard it. I agree with several other readers than a public service campaign might be a good idea.

    That said, revolving doors scare me. I saw a man get his security badge (on a nylon lanyard around his neck) caught in a revolving door. If a bystander hadn't pressed an emergency stop button on a nearby wall, the man could have been choked to death. How many revolving doors have that much force, and what are their safety features? How many have emergency stops, and who could think quickly enough to locate and press them?

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  15. I must be the only person in the world who thinks revolving doors are fun! Kind of like a grown-up merry-go-round!

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    1. No, MaryOK, you are not! They make me feel like a little kid again, and I use them whenever I get the chance!

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  16. I love revolving doors, also. Yes, some people have practical reasons to not use them. Which is why there is always an alternative. I think Janice is referring to the rest of us. And I had never thought about there being so much heat saved by using them. I just always do. But it makes sense.

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